Narsingh (Narasimha) Temple at Chaurasi Temple, Bharmour









Narsingh (Narasimha) Temple 

Narasimha (Sanskrit: Narsingh) or Nrusimha, also spelled as Narasingh, Narsingh and Narasingha, whose name literally translates from Sanskrit as “Man-lion”.  Narasimha is an incarnation of Vishnu in which the god is represented in therianthropic form as half man and half lion. The bronze image of this god, which is exquisitely cast, is awe-inspiring. The alloy used for casting this image has greater content of copper which makes the surface of the bronze somewhat reddish thus suitably agreeing with the terrible form of god. Narasimha is represented as stout muscular figure with terrific lion’s head, mane fully blown, staring at the viewer with wide open eyes and half open mouth. His two hands are held up with extended claws and other two hands are folded under the chin. The deity is sitting on a throne decorated with stylized mountain scenery and gaping lion at both ends.  The idol of Narasimha is housed in nagara style temple of stone which is smaller in size than Manimahesh temple and situated on the western side of compound above the decline of the hill. It was erected by Rani Tribhuvan Rekha and endowed by Raja Yugakar Varman in about 950 AD.